First Line Friday – 12 January 2018 – To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee)

first-line-fridays31

Welcome to First Line Friday, hosted by Hoarding Books! We have a theme this week—diversity, in honour of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (although you can feel free to share non-theme-related first lines too!)—and I couldn’t help reaching for a classic.

I studied Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird in high school here in Australia, and I think it may have been the first time I realized the ugly depths that racism went to and the kind of injustice that people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. were fighting against. I think it’s one of those books everyone should read at least once in their life, and even just opening up to the first page of this book to give you the first line has me thinking it might be time to read it again.


~ About the Book ~

‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ’em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’

Voted the most life changing book by a female author.

A lawyer’s advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee’s classic novel – a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with exuberant humour the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the thirties. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina of one man’s struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story, an anti-racist novel, a historical drama of the Great Depression and a sublime example of the Southern writing tradition.

Amazon US  //  Goodreads

~ First Line ~

When he was nearly thirteen my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.

Have you read this classic?

I’d love it if you’d share the first line of whatever you’re currently reading in the comments. And don’t forget, you can find out what other bloggers are sharing for First Line Friday by going over to Hoarding Books blog and finding all the links. If you’ve got your own blog, why not join in and add your link over there. 🙂

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About Fiction Aficionado

Homeschooling mum, word lover, reader extraordinaire, and follower of Christ
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20 Responses to First Line Friday – 12 January 2018 – To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee)

  1. Happy Friday, Katie! I hope you have a wonderful weekend 🙂

    Like

  2. Beth Erin says:

    I have not! My classic literature knowledge is sorely lacking outside of the romance genre 😉
    I’m diving into Missing Isaac by Valerie Fraser Luesse today!
    A sleepy purple twilight wrapped around the farmhouse, its tall windows glowing with warmth from somewhere inside.

    Like

  3. Becky says:

    I read this for fun when I was in high school. It really opens your eyes to what life was like back then. Great book to spotlight for Martin Luther King Day!

    I’m sharing A Letter from Lancaster County by Kate Lloyd on my blog today, but I’m currently reading Isaiah’s Daughter by Mesu Andrews so I’ll share that here.

    732 BCE (Spring)
    Judean Wilderness

    My friend Yaira said to be brave – but why? Brave or scared, we kept marching. She told me to be a big girl, not to cry, but I’m only five and I’ve seen big men crying.

    Happy Weekend!

    Like

  4. Suzie says:

    It’s been years, but I’ve read it. I should read it again as I would probably appreciate it more when it’s not a class assignment!

    I’ll share the first line from the next book on my TBR list: Until We Find Home by Cathy Gohlke: Lightning crackled, splitting the night sky over Paris, illuminating letters painted on the bookstore window across the street: La Maison des Amis des Livre.

    Like

  5. carylkane says:

    PROLOGUE

    Night crept over the hills, smothering the landscape in a cocoon of darkness that would hide him in a few minutes. – Haven of Swans by Colleen Coble

    Happy Friday and Happy Reading!

    Like

  6. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is my absolute, all-time, #1 favorite book. EVER. I teach English and taught this book for 14 years (before I changed positions). Like watching a movie more than once, you see things you didn’t see the first time. I’ve read this book so many times, and each time I see something new/deeper in the story (symbolism, character, theme) or something clever in Harper Lee’s writing craft. Love this book!

    Like

  7. “Ladies and gentlemen, the captain has asked that you remain in your seats for the remainder of your flight.”

    The Upside of Falling Down by Rebekah Crane

    This book is a love story about a woman who gets amnesia as the result of being told she is the lone survivor of a plane crash and assumes a new identity to avoid her old life and falls in love with an Irish man.

    Like

  8. bellesmoma16 says:

    I absolutely LOVE this book. Atticus is the best dad ever.

    Happy Friday!!!!

    Today on my blog, I am sharing the first line from the novel The Gift of the Inn by Golden Keyes Parsons. So here I will leave the first line from the book I am starting next, Troubled Waters by Susan May Warren.

    Chapter 1
    “Sierra should have brought marshmallows.”

    Like

  9. lelandandbecky says:

    I love these Fridays & reading the first lines from all these books I’ve either enjoyed or want to read!

    My first line is from Rush by Jayme Mansfield:

    “I can’t stop shivering when I sleep alone.”

    Like

  10. Beware Of The Reader says:

    I haven’t read it but seen it everywhere! Happy Friday 😉

    Like

  11. No, I have not read the novel. I am sharing a historical novel set in Victorian England. A TREACHEROUS CURSE by Deanna Rayburn

    Like

  12. Ellie says:

    I have never read this book, but I really should! My first line today is from Robin Lee Hatcher’s You’ll think of Me. I’m reading it now and I have trouble putting it down! “Brooklyn Myers sat on the narrow stretch of lawn beside the brick apartment building, watching her ten-year-old daughter.”

    Like

  13. hjsnyder28 says:

    I know there is a film based on this book with Gregory Peck starring in it–will have to watch it soon. Happy Friday!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. To Kill a Mockingbird is one of my all-time favorite books, if not my number one. The first time I read it was the summer between 5th and 6th grade. I was poking around in my grandparents’ basement where my youngest uncle had a lot of his books and cds and stuff. I had no idea what the book was about when I found it and started reading. A few hours went by and my grandma hollered down the stairs asking what I was doing. When I told her the book I was reading, she about had a heart attack and thought my mom was going to be so mad. Luckily, there was no heart attack or anger. I’ve read it numerous times in the last two decades and I love it more each go-round.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. JaneReads says:

    I read this one in high school and remember it being one of the few English assignments I enjoyed. Our local theater is doing it as a production this summer and I am planning on getting tickets.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Iola says:

    No, I haven’t read To Kill a Mockingbird, although my daughter has.

    I’m sharing the first line from Lady Jayne Disappears by Joanna Davidson Politano on my blog. It has so many great lines!

    I’m currently reading ‘Aint Misbehaving by Marji Lane. Here’s the first line:

    “Her future wasn’t the only thing at stake.”

    Like

  17. Pingback: Weekend Book Buzz – 13/14 January 2018 | Fiction Aficionado

  18. Pingback: Weekend Book Buzz – 20/21 January 2018 | Fiction Aficionado

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